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What support does Wolverhampton offer?


 

Homeless 2 (small)

Throughout the duration of the week, you'll hear about the range of services on offer to those in need in Wolverhampton through our 'Help the Homeless' specials.

Local charities and support groups in the city offer valuable refuge to the vulnerable people of our streets, whether it's offering them some food or the helping hand they need in order to get their lives back on track.

St George's House Charity makes its chief aim to support even the most disadvantaged people in the community- offering them a lifeline. 

We spoke to Kevin Staunton, who's the Service Delivery Officer at the charity:

"The key thing is that it's a voluntary thing, nobody's forced to come here, there's no referrals; people want to be helped.  Which tends to mean the atmosphere's quite productive and positive really."

"The key element to our service is engagement, so we want to know the story.  We want to know the reasons why that person is in this terrible situation and work out a plan to suit them."

One of the men we spoke to used the services at St George's HUB to start turning his life around after suffering from a stroke:

"I just feel inspired to get up and come here in the morning because I know I can get the help I need when I need it.  Even when I'm not sure, staff here will help me and get me on the right track."

Staff at the HUB help him with his difficulties, by referring him to a speech therapist after his speech deteriorated from the stroke.  When speaking to him it became clear that if it wasn't for the guys at St George's he'd probably still be on the streets.

Throughout our campaign at Signal107, we've learnt that the term 'homeless' is a loose one, and that people find themselves in tricky situations often through no choice of their own.

The Haven offers refuge to women and children who have left home in order to escape domestic violence - Hayley Edwards is from there:

"First of all, they usually contact us through the helpline if they're experiencing domestic abuse.  If it's a case of they don't want to leave home, we advise them on the phone as to what their options are."

"When they come to terms with what's happening to them and that it's not right, they'll leave home and seek refuge with us.  We don't want to be at the point where they're in hospital, or god forbid, dead."

The Little Brothers of the Good Shepherd are another key service to the city- they'll serve thousand of citizens a month.  Brother Stephen helps run the soup kitchen along with Brother Charles and a team of workers and volunteers:

"Our service is for the poor, it's part of the community.  We do find people on our programme who are on a very low path indeed, persons who are suicidal- with them we take the situation very seriously and we always try to ensure that when someone is in a bad situation, that we can direct them to the right services."

If you want to listen again to the second part of our specials, you can do here: